38 Ways you can Finally Stop being a D*ck.

Via Shivani Vyas
on Nov 18, 2017
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A man and woman laughed in their cars as they drove away after pushing me off the highway due to road rage.

Friends have ditched me during the hardest times of my life, like when my first pet died due to kidney failure, or when my father was diagnosed with cancer.

For many years, I also succumbed to toxic people who were seemed to be on a mission to destroy my self-confidence and self-worth.

All of the hatred and negativity prompted me to ask myself, “Why can’t people be kinder? Why has it become easier to spread hatred versus love?”

I’m now on a mission to show people that cruelty never solves problems; it extends them. Sometimes we get so wrapped up in our own struggles, priorities, and self-discovery journeys to find bliss, we overlook that finding happiness also means giving back every single day. But just by committing a few acts of kindness each week, we can decrease other’s heartache, ease the world’s difficulties in small ways, and become more supportive and blissful people ourselves.

Though we cannot change the world single-handedly, we can join enough hands together to make a stronger impact. We also don’t have to be powerful leaders, millionaires, or possess IQs of 154 to make changes. Simply by altering our mindsets and how we treat others, we can empower ourselves to add a bit more kindness to this world.

So, here are 38 savvy ways (broken into eight categories) we can make the world a better place:

Communication.

1. Opt out of engaging in road rage. If someone does happen to show you their lovely middle finger, communicate the peace sign in return and just smile.
2. Be firm but courteous to telemarketers. Remember they are just doing their job to pay their bills.
3. Write a thank you card and mail it to someone who has helped you in any way, big or small.
4. Leave positive feedback on Google Reviews for small, locally owned businesses.
5. Never judge someone based on what you think has happened or what you think you’ve seen. Always choose communication over assumption and be accepting of cultural backgrounds different from your own.

Relationships.

6. Be a genuine friend and never pretend to like someone or offer fake compliments. Be authentic, but civil.
7. Love your neighbors by doing something nice for them. Offer to mow their lawn, bake them fresh brownies, or just sincerely ask how their day’s going.
8. Be sincere during holidays by gifting items someone could actually benefit from, not just items you’re re-gifting from another occasion because you couldn’t use them yourself.
9. Build a “feel better” basket for someone going through a crisis, whether it’s personal, health-related, or financial. Pack it with lavender candles, freshly baked cookies, teas, their favorite movie, and organic soap.
10. Appreciate your parents for who they are, not what you want them to be. Remember, they were once children too and are on journeys just like you. They’re not perfect, only human. Call them up. And when visiting them, offer to do a household chore for them from start to finish.
11. Accept that not everyone’s heart will match up to yours, and still choose to kill em’ with kindness anyways. If this doesn’t work, limit your interactions with any surrounding toxic people.
12. If you’re lucky enough to still have grandparents, visit them as much as you can. Bring them small gifts like warm socks or cozy blankets for winter.

Food.

13. Cook a family member their favorite meal at a random time during the year and share it with them.
14. If you celebrate Thanksgiving, volunteer at a soup kitchen at least once on this holiday.
15. Notice a homeless person at a traffic light asking for money? Give them food instead. I once gave a homeless man a fresh mango, and his eyes filled of joy. This is a great option if you worry about where your money goes after giving it to a community member in need.
16. Buy special foods for those with food sensitivities. Surprise a coworker with a box of gluten-free pasta if they have Celiac disease, nut-free items for those with peanut allergies, or soy-free desserts for soy allergies.
17. If you tend to buy more produce than you need and end up throwing some of it away (because you didn’t have time to cook it), either buy less or freeze your produce as soon as you get it. This act of kindness is one toward our environment, which touches us all. Prevent food waste in any way you can—this could mean taking smaller servings at food buffets, too.

Money.

18. Place a $10 bill underneath a car’s windshield wipers in a parking lot randomly. Imagine how happy they’ll be to find that bill!
19. Visit children’s hospitals with toys and funny party supplies. Even the dollar store has a whole aisle full of children’s toys—$12 could help 12 kids.
20. Tip your servers well. Many times, their income is already below minimum wage, so they truly rely on tips to make a living.
21. Leave a $5 bill on top of a vending machine for the next person.
22. Pay for the order of the person behind you in a drive-through.

Community & Environment.

23. Offer help when you can. Tutor a student in a subject you know well for free, or assist an elderly person in carrying their groceries to their car.
24. Gather all unused stationary or office supplies and donate them to a nearby underprivileged school.
25. Stop littering.
26. Clean your home with green products.
27. Recycle everything that you can by reading product labels and printing out a reminder list of what is not recyclable versus what is (then post this list on your fridge or directly on the recycling bin).

Living Beings.

28. Volunteer at no-kill animal shelters and adopt pets whenever possible instead of buying. Thousands of shelters worldwide have pets aching for love, many from abusive homes.
29. Take diligent care of any living things in your home, whether they’re plants or pets. Water your plants, provide fresh nutritious food for your pets, and love both.
30. Practice going meatless at least one day/week.
31. If an insect happens to get into your house, see if you can capture it in a glass and set it free outside. Remember, they have homes too and essentially have gotten lost and ended up in yours by mistake. Also, step over worms after a rainstorm, instead of on them.
32. Don’t buy plants if you don’t have the time, resources, or energy to take care of them. They are living things too. If you don’t have the time but still want plants in your home, opt in for faux plants instead.

Self.

33. Seek help and support if you suffer from a mental illness, never be ashamed of it!
34. Treat your body with love, it is your true home. Give it eight glasses of water each day, nutritious food, time in nature, exercise, and meditation.
35. Create organizations that could fulfill some type of need in your local community—an anti-bullying club, anti-littering team, or a neighborhood watch group.
36. Organize your spaces and free them of clutter. Donate your clutter to a nearby Salvation Army, Goodwill, or other organization who could make good use of them.
37. Believe in yourself, your capabilities, and strength.
38. Love yourself and all your kookiness too—it makes you unique.

Yes, this is a huge list! It’s not meant to overwhelm you but instead offer a resource you can revisit over and over if you’d like to try a new way of giving back. No matter what income, age, or background we come from, we can practice at least some of the things on this list. See if you can choose just five for now that you commit to doing over the course of the next month!

Through being of benefit and contributing in a positive way, we can all find our bliss.

“Helping one person might not change the world, but it could change the world for one person.” 

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Author: Shivani Vyas
Image: @elephantjournal/Instagram
Editor: Callie Rushton
Copy Editor: Lieselle Davidson
Social Editor: Waylon Lewis

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About Shivani Vyas

Shivani Vyas is a communicator, influencer, organizer, writer, and “kindness spreader.” She’s also an animal lover, pasta-obsessed vegetarian, yoga enthusiast, and home decorating aficionado. She’s the kooky genius behind Organizational-Bliss and is currently earning her MA in Communications from Johns Hopkins. In the midst of writing her first book as part of a 20-something series, she hopes to inspire all of her readers, at any age, to become more blissful, organized people.

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